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The Lead

Europeans Were Lactose Intolerant Post Agriculture

October 22, 2014 | by Univ. College Dublin | News | Comments

By analyzing DNA extracted from the petrous bones of skulls of ancient Europeans, scientists have identified that these peoples remained intolerant to lactose for 5,000 years after they adopted agricultural practices and 4,000 years after the onset of cheese-making.

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Ebola 'Czar' Gets to Work

October 22, 2014 2:00 pm | by Associated Press, Connie Cass, Alicia Caldwell | News | Comments

A TV news cameraman treated for Ebola is going home today, the fifth patient transported from West Africa to recover at a U.S. hospital, as President Barack Obama brought together top aides and his new Ebola "czar," Ron Klain, to coordinate a national response to the deadly disease.

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Dental Care Linked to Respiratory Risks in ICU

October 22, 2014 2:00 pm | by Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America | News | Comments

New research shows vulnerable patients in the intensive care unit who received enhanced oral care from a dentist were at significantly less risk for developing a lower respiratory tract infection, like ventilator-associated pneumonia, during their stay.

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1918's Spanish Flu Can Teach Us About Pandemics

October 22, 2014 2:00 pm | by Michigan State Univ. | News | Comments

Just in time for flu season, a new study of “the mother of all pandemics” could offer insight into infection control measures for the flu and other epidemic diseases. In 1918, the Spanish flu killed 50 million people worldwide, 10 to 20 million of whom were in India. In the U.S. alone, the Spanish flu claimed 675,000 lives in nine months.

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Cars Are Exceeding Fuel Economy Standards

October 22, 2014 2:00 pm | by Univ. of Michigan | News | Comments

In the three years since a new standard for gas mileage has been in effect, automakers have surpassed it each year, improving new vehicle fuel economy by about a mile per gallon annually.

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3-D Videos of Trees Help People Get Over Stress

October 22, 2014 2:00 pm | by Univ. of Illinois | News | Comments

While numerous studies have affirmed nature’s stress-reduction properties, scientists haven’t known the specific amount of exposure needed to induce these calming effects. Now, researchers have found that viewing 3-D videos of residential streets with varying amounts of tree canopy significantly improved participants’ physiological and psychological recovery from a stressful experience.

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Software Finds Tiny Leaks in Natural Gas Pipelines

October 22, 2014 2:00 pm | by ACS | News | Comments

Major leaks from oil and gas pipelines have led to home evacuations, explosions, millions of dollars in lawsuit payouts and valuable natural resources escaping into the air, ground and water. Now, scientists say they have developed a new software-based method that finds leaks even when they’re small, which could help prevent serious incidents— and save money for customers and industry.

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Olive Oil is the Best for Frying

October 22, 2014 2:00 pm | by ACS | News | Comments

Frying is one of the world’s most popular ways to prepare food. But before dunking your favorite food in a vat of just any old oil, consider using olive. Scientists are reporting that olive oil withstands the heat of the fryer or pan better than several seed oils to yield more healthful food.

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World Record Achieved in Smart Circuits

October 22, 2014 7:00 am | by Chalmers Univ. of Technology | News | Comments

Fewer cords, smaller antennas and quicker video transmission may be the result of a new type of microwave circuit. The research team behind these new circuits currently holds an attention-grabbing world record.

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Microscope Sees Defects in Nanotubes

October 22, 2014 7:00 am | by Univ. of Oregon | News | Comments

Chemists have devised a way to see the internal structures of electronic waves trapped in carbon nanotubes by external electrostatic charges. However, these traps, or defects, in ultra-thin nanotubes can compromise their effectiveness.

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Cosmic Rays Threaten Future Astronaut Missions

October 22, 2014 7:00 am | by Univ. of New Hampshire | News | Comments

Crewed missions to Mars remain an essential goal for NASA, but scientists are only now beginning to understand and characterize the radiation hazards that could make such ventures risky. A researcher says that, because of a highly abnormal and extended lack of solar activity, the solar wind is exhibiting extremely low densities and magnetic field strengths, which causes dangerous levels of hazardous radiation.

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Shift Workers Should Skip High-iron Foods at Night

October 22, 2014 7:00 am | by Univ. of Utah | News | Comments

Workers punching in for the graveyard shift may be better off not eating high-iron foods at night so they don’t disrupt the circadian clock in their livers. Disrupted circadian clocks, researchers believe, are the reason that shift workers experience higher incidences of type 2 diabetes, obesity and cancer.

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Color, Texture Matter Most for Tomatoes

October 22, 2014 7:00 am | by Institute of Food Technologists | News | Comments

A new study evaluated consumers’ choice in fresh tomato selection and revealed which characteristics make the red fruit most appealing. The researchers found that the most important fresh tomato attributes were color, amount of juice when sliced and size.

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Peanuts in Dust Linked to Allergy in Kids with Mutation

October 22, 2014 7:00 am | by King’s College London | News | Comments

A new study has found a strong link between exposure to peanut protein in household dust during infancy and the development of peanut allergy in children genetically predisposed to a skin barrier defect.

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Report Considers Future of Transport

October 22, 2014 7:00 am | by Information Technology and Innovation Foundation, Robert Atkinson | News | Comments

Information and communications technology has already revolutionized industries from publishing and entertainment to education and health care– and now, it’s transportation’s turn. Two easy examples: commuters can access real-time traffic information via their mobile phones, while adaptive signal lights can sense that a car is waiting at a red light with no cross-traffic present and switch to green to accommodate it.

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Aquaponic Systems Can Be Sustainable

October 22, 2014 7:00 am | by Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service | Videos | Comments

If growing vegetables in a box with no soil and out of direct sunlight sounds a little fishy, well, it is. Aquaponics is a relatively new way of intensified farming that combines aquaculture and hydroponics, according to a vegetable specialist.

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