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A bipartisan group of lawmakers is calling for the release of information on the lives of retired research animals.

The group is led by Erik Paulsen (R-MN) and Brendan Boyle (D-PA), both of whom have been named Waste Warriors by White Coat Waste, an animal rights group based in Washington, DC.

“I can’t think of any right-wing groups that have taken on animal research before,” Tom Holder, the director of Speaking of Research, an international organization that supports the use of animals in scientific labs, said in a 2016 interview about White Coat Waste. “It’s a new way to crowbar off policymakers who might not otherwise support” efforts to end the use of animals in research.

The group send a letter to the Department of Interior, the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Department of Veterans Affairs, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the Smithsonian Institution, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Department of Defense (DoD).

The letter was first reported by the political news website, Roll Call.

“We are writing today to obtain information about your agency’s policies for the adoption and retirement of dogs, cats and primates no longer needed in research,” the letter reads.

The NIH's Office of Laboratory Animal Welfare (OLAW) supports the concept of adopting out retired laboratory animals that are no longer needed for research. Ultimately, research facilities are given the freedom to develop the animal adoption policies that fit their needs.

The group of lawmakers stated that they are "concerned to discover through our offices’ research a lack of formalized policies and procedures addressing this subject across federal agencies."

The letter asked for statistics on the number of dogs, cats, and primates used for research during the 2016 and 2017 fiscal years.

The group also requested the number and location of animals adopted out or retired during these years, as well as the location of where animals were placed.

Twenty-seven lawmakers signed the letter.

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