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Scientist of the Week
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Scientist of the Week: Alan Feduccia

August 21, 2014 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Alan Feduccia and Stephen Czerkas found that a birdlike fossil, called a Scansoriopteryx, is not a dinosaur, as previously thought, but much rather the remains of a tiny tree-climbing animal that could glide. Their find challenges the commonly held belief that birds evolved from ground-dwelling theropod dinosaurs that gained the ability to fly.

Scientist of the Week: Thomas Bosch

August 14, 2014 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Thomas Bosch and a team from Kiel Univ. have found that cancer has existed for as long as multi-...

Scientist of the Week: Tim Kohler

August 7, 2014 7:00 am | by Washington State Univ. | News | Comments

Tim Kohler and a team from Washington State Univ. studied one of the greatest baby booms in...

Scientist of the Week: Jeffrey Bada

July 24, 2014 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Jeffrey Bada and a team from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego analyzed...

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Scientist of the Week: John VandeBerg

July 17, 2014 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

John VandeBerg and a team from the Texas Biomedical Research Institute have established unequivocally, in a natural animal model, that the incidence of malignant melanoma in adulthood can be dramatically reduced by the consistent use of sunscreen in infancy and childhood.

Scientist of the Week: Jon Major

July 10, 2014 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Jon Major and a team from the Univ. of Liverpool found that a chemical used to make tofu and bath salts could also replace a highly toxic and expensive substance used to make solar cells.

Scientist of the Week: Daniele Lantagne

June 5, 2014 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Daniele Lantagne and a team found that the EPA’s recommendations for treating water after a natural disaster or other emergencies call for more chlorine bleach than is necessary to kill disease-causing pathogens, and are often impractical to carry out.

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Scientist of the Week: Kees Jan van Groenigen

May 22, 2014 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Kees Jan van Groenigen and Bruce Hungate found that increased levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere cause soil microbes to produce more carbon dioxide, accelerating climate change.

Scientist of the Week: Donita Brady

May 15, 2014 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Donita Brady and a team from Duke Univ. found that drugs used to block copper absorption may find an additional use as a treatment for certain types of cancer.

Scientist of the Week: Wieger Wamelink

May 8, 2014 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Wieger Wamelink and a team from Wageningen Univ. discovered that Martian soil could, in theory, be used to cultivate crops.

Scientist of the Week: Shaun Lovejoy

May 1, 2014 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

By analyzing temperature data all the way back to 1500, Shaun Lovejoy from McGill Univ. all but ruled out the possibility that global warming in the industrial era is just a natural fluctuation in the Earth’s climate.

Scientist of the Week: Thiago Verano-Braga

April 17, 2014 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Verano-Braga and a team from the Univ. of Southern Denmark discovered that nanosilver can penetrate our cells and cause damage.

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Scientist of the Week: Thomas Junk

April 10, 2014 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Thomas Junk and a team from the Univ. of Louisiana at Lafayette developed a method to turn fat from alligators and other animals into biofuel.

Scientist of the Week: Arif Cetin

April 3, 2014 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Arif Cetin and a team from EPFL have developed an "optical lab on a chip,” a hand-held device that can quickly analyze up to 170,000 different molecules in a blood sample.

Scientist of the Week: Nir Krakauer

March 27, 2014 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Nir Krakauer, from the City College of New York, worked with his father and found that a technique, known as A Body Shape Index (ABSI), is a more effective predictor of mortality than Body Mass Index (BMI), the most common measure used to define obesity.

Scientist of the Week: Graham Kendall

March 6, 2014 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Graham Kendall and Phil Hingston from the Univ. of Nottingham solved the famous knight’s tour chess problem with ants.

Scientist of the Week: Yael Vodovotz

February 27, 2014 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Yael Vodovotz and a team from The Ohio State Univ. used black raspberry-based foods to see if they could improve post-surgery outcomes for men with prostate cancer.

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Scientist of the Week: Cristian Varela

February 20, 2014 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Cristian Varela and a team from the Australian Wine Research Institute found that special yeast can produce a lower level of alcohol in wine, helping to preserve the flavor.

Scientist of the Week: Jens Krog

February 13, 2014 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Jens Krog and a team from the Univ. of Southern Denmark preformed new calculations that confirm that the universe may one day collapse– and they concluded that the risk of a collapse is even greater than previously thought.

Scientist of the Week: Julie Boergers

February 6, 2014 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Julie Boergers and a team from Lifespan linked later school start times to improved sleep and mood in teens.

Scientist of the Week: Theodore Garland

January 30, 2014 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Theodore Garland and a team from UC Riverside found that Darwin was right: island lizards exhibit less fear and appear “tame.”

Scientist of the Week: Herman Pontzer

January 23, 2014 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Herman Pontzer, of Hunter College, and a team made up of individuals from many organizations found that humans and other primates burn 50 percent fewer calories each day than other mammals.

Scientist of the Week: James Wray

January 16, 2014 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

James Wray and a team from the Georgia Institute of Technology found that Mars is much more geologically complex than believed and has a mineral found in granite, known as feldspar.

Scientist of the Week: Robert Hazen

January 9, 2014 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Robert Hazen from the Carnegie Institution for Science compiled a list of every plausible mineral species on the early Earth and concluded that no more than 420 different minerals would have been present at or near Earth’s surface.

Scientist of the Week: Maki Inoue-Choi

December 26, 2013 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Maki Inoue-Choi and a team from the Univ. of Minnesota School of Public Health found that postmenopausal women who consumed sugar-sweetened beverages were more likely to develop the most common type of endometrial cancer compared with women who did not drink sugar-sweetened beverages.

Scientist of the Week: Kathryn Medler

December 19, 2013 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Kathryn Medler and a team from the Univ. at Buffalo found that being severely overweight impaired the ability of mice to detect sweet flavors.

Scientist of the Week: Peter Grace

December 12, 2013 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Peter Grace, and a team from the Univ. of Colorado at Boulder, found that using morphine to fight pain after abdominal surgery may actually prolong a patient's suffering, doubling or even tripling the amount of time it takes to recover.

Scientist of the Week: Matthew McCluskey

December 5, 2013 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Matthew McCluskey and a team from Washington State Univ. achieved a 400-fold increase in the electrical conductivity of a crystal simply by exposing it to light.

Scientist of the Week: David Cook

October 31, 2013 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

David Cook and a team from the Univ. of Washington School of Medicine found that just one mild explosion can cause changes in the brain that have similarities to those found in diseases like Alzheimer's disease and chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

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