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Scientist of the Week
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Q&A: Diane Favro and Rebuilding Ancient Rome

March 26, 2015 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Laboratory Equipment’s scientist of the week is Diane Favro from UCLA. Favro and a team recreated Augustan Rome algorithmically using a technique known as procedural modeling. According to legend, the founder of the Roman Empire, Augustus, boasted, “I found Rome a city of bricks and left it a city of marble.” Favro wanted to know if he telling the truth or making an empty claim.

Q&A: Nils Stenseth, Asia's Climate and Europe's Plague

March 12, 2015 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Laboratory Equipment’s scientist of the week is Nils Stenseth, from the Univ. of Oslo....

Q&A: Baskaran Thyagarajan, Chilies and Weight Loss

March 5, 2015 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Laboratory Equipment’s scientist of the week is Baskaran Thyagarajan from the Univ. of...

Q&A: Kay Tye and Food Cravings in the Brain

February 26, 2015 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Laboratory Equipment’s scientist of the week is Kay Tye from MIT. She and a team found...

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Q&A: Kelsey Witt and the American Dog

February 12, 2015 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Laboratory Equipment’s scientist of the week is Kelsey Witt from the Univ. of Illinois. She and a team found that dogs may have first successfully migrated to the Americas only about 10,000 years ago, thousands of years after the first human migrants crossed a land bridge from Siberia to North America.

Q&A: Flint Dibble and the Dirt of a Dead Civilization

January 29, 2015 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

This week’s scientist is Flint Dibble from the Univ. of Cincinnati, working with Daniel Fallu, a doctoral student in archaeology at Boston Univ., he has cast traditional research about the Greek village Nichoria into doubt.

Ola Benderius and the 70-year-old Driving Mystery

January 22, 2015 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

This week’s Scientist of the Week is Ola Benderius from Chalmers Univ. of Technology. He and a team solved a 70-year-old driving mystery: why do people jerk the wheel?

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Q&A: Ian Armit and the Fall of the Bronze Age

January 15, 2015 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

This week’s scientist is Ian Armit. He and a team from the Univ. of Bradford definitively proved that climate change did not cause the huge population collapse in Europe at the end of the Bronze Age.

Q&A: Robert Sclafani and Wine’s Role in Cancer

January 8, 2015 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

This week’s scientist is Robert Sclafani from the Univ. of Colorado School of Medicine. He and a team discovered that, while alcohol use is a risk factor for head and neck cancer, the chemical resveratrol found in grape skins and in red wine may prevent cancer as well.

Q&A: Grant Zazula and the Disappearance of Mastodons

December 18, 2014 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

This week’s Scientist of the Week is Grant Zazula, a paleontologist for the government of Yukon. He and a team debunked theories that over-hunting by early humans led to the disappearance of mastodons from the Arctic and Subarctic.

Q&A: Susanne Renner and the History of the Watermelon

December 11, 2014 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

This week’s Scientist of the Week is Susanne Renner from Ludwig Maximilians Universität München. She and a team discovered that botanists made a mistake, over 80 years ago, when they concluded that edible watermelon came from South Africa.

Q&A: Paul Talalay, Broccoli Sprouts & Autism

December 4, 2014 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

This week’s Scientist of the Week is Paul Talalay of Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. He and a team performed a clinical trial on 40 boys and men between the ages of 13 and 27. Their results suggest that a chemical derived from broccoli sprouts may ease classic behavioral symptoms in those with autism spectrum disorders.

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Scientist of the Week: Diego Garcia-Bellido

November 13, 2014 7:00 am | by Megan Roche, Editorial Intern | News | Comments

Diego Garcia-Bellido and a team from the Univ. of Adelaide found fossils that were confirmed as distant cousins to humans.

Conversations with National Medal of Science Winners

November 12, 2014 4:40 pm | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

The National Medal of Science, created by Congress in 1959, is the country’s highest honor for achievement and leadership in advancing the fields of science and technology. A 12-member presidential committee, presented by the National Science Foundation, selects the award recipients. Recently announced by President Obama, the editors catch up with 2014 National Medal of Science winners to get their thoughts on the award.

Scientist in the Spotlight: Visiting the Red Planet— in Hawaii

November 12, 2014 3:41 pm | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

Jocelyn Dunn, an industrial engineering doctoral student at Purdue Univ., is a part of a project to live on a landscape mimicking Mars for eight months. Along with five other researchers, she will be living in a domed habitat emulating what settlers might have on Mars. While exploring the environment, they will wear spacesuits and their communications will be delayed by 20 minutes to emulate the drag they would experience on the Red Planet.

Scientist of the Week: David Sanders

November 6, 2014 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

David Sanders from Purdue Univ. found that the Ebola virus could become airborne as it can enter cells that line the trachea and lungs under controlled laboratory conditions.

Scientist of the Week: Mary Cushman

October 30, 2014 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Mary Cushman and a team from the Univ. of Vermont College of Medicine discovered that people with blood type AB may be more likely to develop memory loss in later years than people with other blood types.

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Scientist of the Week: Justin Yeakel

October 23, 2014 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Justin Yeakel and a team used depictions of animals in ancient Egyptian artifacts to assemble a detailed record of the large mammals that lived in the Nile Valley over the past 6,000 years.

Scientist of the Week: Calvin Miller

October 16, 2014 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Calvin Miller and a team studying in Iceland found that conditions on Earth for the first 500 million years after it formed may have been surprisingly similar to the present day, not a hellscape as thought.

Scientist of the Week: Sandi Carmen

October 9, 2014 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Sandi Carmen and a team from EPFL discovered that stress activates a cleaving enzyme in the brain that can lead to people being distracted, grumpy, forgetful and more.

Bringing History into Three Dimensions

October 3, 2014 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

The Turkana Basin, which stretches from northern Kenya to southern Ethiopia, is one of the most continuous fossil records of the Plio-Pleistocene, with some fossils as old as the Cretaceous period. This August and September, the treasure trove of prehistoric records was studied by paleontologist Louise Leakey, the granddaughter of the famous Louis and Mary Leakey.

Scientist of the Week: Jurriaan de Vos

October 2, 2014 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Jurriaan de Vos and a team found that extinctions are about 1,000 times more frequent now than in the 60 million years before people came along.

Scientist of the Week: Claire Sexton

September 25, 2014 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Claire Sexton and a team from the Univ. of Oxford found that sleep difficulties may be linked to decline in brain volume.

Scientist of the Week: Kristian Carlson

September 18, 2014 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Kristian Carlson and a team from Wits Univ. studying the Taung Child— South Africa’s premier hominin— have cast doubt on the idea that this early hominin shows infant brain development in the prefrontal region similar to that of modern humans.

Scientist of the Week: Maurice Ohayon

September 11, 2014 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Maurice Ohayon from the Stanford Univ. School of Medicine found that one in seven people suffers from sleep drunkenness.

Scientist of the Week: Martin Smith

September 4, 2014 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Martin Smith and a team from the Univ. of Cambridge found how a mysterious, long-extinct worm-like creature with legs and spikes called Hallucigenia, fits into the evolutionary tree.

Scientist of the Week: Therese O'Sullivan

August 28, 2014 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Therese O'Sullivan and a team from Edith Cowan Univ. found that eating higher amounts of cheese, milk, yogurt or butter does not make a person more likely to die from cardiovascular disease, cancer or any other cause.

Scientist of the Week: Alan Feduccia

August 21, 2014 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Alan Feduccia and Stephen Czerkas found that a birdlike fossil, called a Scansoriopteryx, is not a dinosaur, as previously thought, but much rather the remains of a tiny tree-climbing animal that could glide. Their find challenges the commonly held belief that birds evolved from ground-dwelling theropod dinosaurs that gained the ability to fly.

Scientist of the Week: Thomas Bosch

August 14, 2014 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Thomas Bosch and a team from Kiel Univ. have found that cancer has existed for as long as multi-cellular life.

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