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Treadmill Ability Indicator of Mortality

March 2, 2015 7:00 am | by Johns Hopkins | News | Comments

Analyzing data from 58,000 heart stress tests, cardiologists report they have developed a formula that estimates one’s risk of dying over a decade based on a person’s ability to exercise on a treadmill at an increasing speed and incline.

Printing Offers New Drug Delivery Method

March 2, 2015 7:00 am | by Society of Interventional Radiology | News | Comments

Researchers and engineers collaborated to print catheters, stents and filaments that were...

Your Brain Knows Your Next Move Before You Do

February 27, 2015 3:00 pm | by Howard Hughes Medical Institute | News | Comments

With half a second's planning, an animal’s brain prepares it to quickly and precisely execute...

Smokers Use Nicotine in Multiple Forms

February 27, 2015 3:00 pm | by Associated Press, Lauran Neergaard | News | Comments

The first peek at a major study of how Americans smoke suggests many use combinations of...

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Your Brain Knows Your Next Move Before You Do

February 27, 2015 3:00 pm | by Howard Hughes Medical Institute | News | Comments

With half a second's planning, an animal’s brain prepares it to quickly and precisely execute complex movements. Scientists have identified a neural circuit that transforms the flurry of activity that occurs during this preparatory period into commands that direct muscle movements.

Raw Milk is More Dangerous than Beneficial

February 27, 2015 3:00 pm | by Tufts Univ. | News | Comments

Raw milk is milk that has not undergone pasteurization, the bacteria-killing heat treatment designed to reduce human pathogens and increase shelf life. Unpasteurized milk can contain potentially harmful and deadly pathogens. So, why do people go so crazy for raw milk? They do so because of the supposed health benefits, which include improved immunity, allergy relief and gastrointestinal health.

Statistical Mechanics Will Save You from Zombies

February 27, 2015 3:00 pm | by American Physical Society | News | Comments

Reading World War Z, an oral history of the first zombie war, inspired researchers to explore how an "actual" zombie outbreak might play out in the U.S. Focusing on a fictional zombie outbreak as an approach to disease modeling suggests heading for the hills, in the Rockies, to save your brains from the undead.

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Smokers Use Nicotine in Multiple Forms

February 27, 2015 3:00 pm | by Associated Press, Lauran Neergaard | News | Comments

The first peek at a major study of how Americans smoke suggests many use combinations of products, and often e-cigarettes are part of the mix. It's a preliminary finding, but it highlights some key questions as health officials assess electronic cigarettes.

Asian Herb May Treat Ebola

February 27, 2015 7:00 am | by Texas Biomedical Research Institute | News | Comments

A team of scientists has announced that a small molecule called Tetrandrine, derived from an Asian herb, has shown to be a potent small molecule inhibiting infection of human white blood cells in vitro or petri dish experiments and prevented Ebola virus disease in mice.

Quarantines Should Be Based on Science

February 26, 2015 3:00 pm | by Associated Press, Lauran Neergaard | News | Comments

Attempts to quarantine health workers returning from Ebola-stricken West Africa were a mistake, the president's bioethics advisers said today. The panel concluded that the nation must improve its health infrastructure and emergency response to be ready to respond quickly to next major disease outbreak.

How Eyelash Length Protects Health

February 26, 2015 3:00 pm | by Georgia Institute of Technology | News | Comments

A team has discovered that 22 species of mammals– from humans, to hedgehogs to giraffes­– are the same: their eyelash length is one-third the width of their eye. Anything shorter or longer, including the fake eyelashes that are popular in Hollywood and make-up aisles, increases airflow around the eye and leads to more dust hitting the surface.

Belief is as Powerful as Nicotine in Brain

February 26, 2015 3:00 pm | by Virginia Tech | News | Comments

Two identical cigarettes led to a discovery by scientists. Study participants inhaled nicotine, yet they showed significantly different brain activity. Why the difference? Some subjects were told their cigarettes were nicotine free.

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One Million Men Used to Study Effects of Blocking Inflammation

February 26, 2015 3:00 pm | by Univ. of Cambridge | News | Comments

Inflammation— the body’s response to damaging stimuli— may have a protective effect against cardiovascular disease, according to a study. The finding is one of the outcomes of research using a powerful new genetic tool— containing data from over a million individuals— that mimics the behavior of certain anti-inflammatory drugs.

Q&A: Kay Tye and Food Cravings in the Brain

February 26, 2015 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Laboratory Equipment’s scientist of the week is Kay Tye from MIT. She and a team found that the desire for sugar and the urge to eat healthy foods are on separate neural circuits. This means that it might be possible to reduce the urge to eat unhealthy foods without impacting the drive to eat healthily when hungry.

More than Eight Hours of Sleep Linked to Higher Stroke Risk

February 26, 2015 7:00 am | by Univ. of Cambridge | News | Comments

People who sleep for more than eight hours a day have an increased risk of stroke, according to a study. This risk doubles for older people who persistently sleep longer than average. However, the researchers say it is unclear why this association exists and call for further research to explore the link.

Today in Lab History: John Harvey Kellogg

February 26, 2015 7:00 am | by Lily Barback, Associate Editor | News | Comments

John Harvey Kellogg, born Feb. 26, 1852, was an American medical doctor who ran a sanitarium using holistic methods, with a particular focus on nutrition, enemas and exercise. Kellogg was an advocate of vegetarianism who advised low calorie diets and developed peanut butter, corn flakes and granola.

Natural Antifreeze in Ticks Fights Frostbite in Mice

February 26, 2015 7:00 am | by Yale Univ. | News | Comments

A protein that protects ticks from freezing temperatures also prevents frostbite when introduced in mice, a study has found. The research is the first to demonstrate the protein's ability to boost frostbite resistance in an adult mammal.

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HIV Drug May Fight Strep, Flesh-eating Bacteria

February 25, 2015 3:00 pm | by ACS | News | Comments

With antibiotic resistance on the rise, scientists are looking for innovative ways to combat bacterial infections. The pathogen that causes conditions from strep throat to flesh-eating disease is among them, but scientists have now found a tool that could help them fight it: a drug approved to treat HIV.

Healthy Cereal May Contain Mold-related Toxin

February 25, 2015 3:00 pm | by ACS | News | Comments

Oats are often touted for boosting heart health, but scientists warn that the grain and its products might need closer monitoring for potential mold contamination. They report that some oat-based breakfast cereals in the U.S. contain a mold-related toxin called ochratoxin A, which has been linked to kidney cancer in animal studies.

Widely Used Food Additive Poses Health Risks

February 25, 2015 3:00 pm | by Georgia State Univ. | News | Comments

Emulsifiers, which are added to most processed foods to aid texture and extend shelf life, can alter the gut microbiota composition and localization to induce intestinal inflammation that promotes the development of inflammatory bowel disease and metabolic syndrome.

Mussel Supplement Aids Damaged Muscles

February 25, 2015 7:00 am | by Indiana Univ. | News | Comments

There may be a greater connection between mussels and muscles than previously thought. The study has found that taking a pre-exercise supplement of the omega-3 PCSO-524, a marine oil lipid derived from the New Zealand green-lipped mussel, has significant positive effects on post-exercise muscle damage.

Mentally Ill Patients Less Likely to Receive Lifestyle Advice

February 25, 2015 7:00 am | by Univ. of Illinois | News | Comments

The American Diabetes Association recommends that health care providers counsel all patients with diabetes or at high risk of diabetes about physical activity and healthy dietary choices. But, more than half of patients with symptoms of mental illness– and nearly one-third of those who also had diabetes– said their health care providers had never told them to exercise or reduce their intake of dietary fat.

Ancient Viruses May Affect Modern Embryo Development

February 25, 2015 7:00 am | by Inside Science News Service, Charles Choi | News | Comments

Viruses that invaded the DNA of humanity's ancestors millions of years ago may now play critical roles in the earliest stages of human development, researchers say. The discovery sheds light on the key part that viruses may have played in human evolution.  

Mapping Lizard Venom Key to New Drugs

February 25, 2015 7:00 am | by Aarhus Univ. | News | Comments

The most well-known venomous lizard is the gila monster– a heavy-bodied lizard. Now, researchers have made a comprehensive description of the proteins in the venom. This knowledge not only provides insight into the function and evolution of venom proteins, but can also prove to be relevant in connection with developing new types of drugs.  

Love Can Sober You Up

February 25, 2015 7:00 am | by Univ. of Sydney | Videos | Comments

Oxytocin, sometimes referred to as the “love” or “cuddle” hormone, has a legendary status in popular culture because of its vital role in social and sexual behavior and long-term bonding. Now, researchers have discovered it also has a remarkable influence on the intoxicating effect of alcohol.  

New Polio Vaccine Gets Funding for Development, Trail

February 25, 2015 7:00 am | by Georgia Institute of Technology | News | Comments

A research team has been awarded $2.5 million in grants from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to advance the development of dissolvable microneedle patches for polio immunization. The patches will be studied to evaluate their potential role as part of the worldwide efforts to eradicate polio.

Early Exposure to Peanuts Actually Prevents Allergy

February 24, 2015 3:00 pm | by Immune Tolerance Network | News | Comments

A new study has demonstrated that consumption of a peanut-containing snack by infants who are at high-risk for developing peanut allergy prevents the subsequent development of allergy. This is the first randomized trial to prevent food allergy in a large cohort of high-risk infants.

Europe-ravaging Plague Was Driven by Asia's Climate

February 24, 2015 3:00 pm | by The Conversation, Boris Schmid, Nils Stenseth | News | Comments

Plague outbreaks that ravaged Europe were thought to be caused by rodent reservoirs of infected rats. New research questions that theory. If the thesis were correct, we would expect plague outbreaks to be associated with local climate fluctuations. The study found plague outbreaks were associated with climate fluctuations– but in Asia.

Angry Outbursts Can Trigger a Heart Attack

February 24, 2015 3:00 pm | by Univ. of Sydney | News | Comments

The risk of a heart attack is 8.5 times higher in the two hours following a burst of intense anger, according to a study that investigated the link between acute emotional triggers and high risk of severe cardiac episodes.

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