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Liquid Helium Yields Charged Molecules

October 24, 2014 2:00 pm | by Univ. of Leicester | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a completely new way of forming charged molecules that offers tremendous potential for new areas of chemical research. They discovered helium atoms can acquire an excess negative charge that enables them to become aggressive new chemical reagents.

Amino Acids Key to Gold Extraction Method

October 24, 2014 2:00 pm | by ScienceNetwork WA | News | Comments

Scientists have developed a gold and copper extraction process using an amino acid–hydrogen...

Synthetic Biology on Normal Paper Yields Biosensors

October 24, 2014 7:00 am | by Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering | News | Comments

New achievements in synthetic biology will allow complex cellular recognition reactions to...

Study Reveals Secrets of Carbonic Acid

October 24, 2014 7:00 am | by Berkely Lab | News | Comments

Carbonic acid, the hydrated form of carbon dioxide, is critical to both the health of the...

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The Chemistry of Candy

October 24, 2014 7:00 am | by ACS | Videos | Comments

Ever wonder why your favorite sweets taste, well, sweet? Whether they’re made with sugar or artificial sweeteners, it all comes down to chemistry, and a very special shape known as the "sweetness triangle."

Synthetic Biology on Normal Paper Yields Biosensors

October 24, 2014 7:00 am | by Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering | News | Comments

New achievements in synthetic biology will allow complex cellular recognition reactions to proceed outside of living cells. There could one day be inexpensive, shippable and accurate test kits that use saliva or a drop of blood to identify specific disease or infection— a feat that could be accomplished anywhere in the world, within minutes and without laboratory support, just by using a pocket–sized paper diagnostic tool.

Researchers Break Barrier to Engineer First Protein Microfiber

October 23, 2014 2:00 pm | by New York Univ. Polytechnic School of Engineering | News | Comments

Researchers have broken new ground in the development of proteins that form specialized fibers used in medicine and nanotechnology. For as long as scientists have been able to create new proteins that are capable of self-assembling into fibers, their work has taken place on the nanoscale. Now, this achievement has been realized on the microscale.

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Patch May Replace Syringe in Medical Diagnostics

October 23, 2014 7:00 am | by ACS | News | Comments

Drawing blood and testing it is standard practice for many medical diagnostics. As a less painful alternative, scientists are developing skin patches that could, one day, replace the syringe.

Olive Oil is the Best for Frying

October 22, 2014 2:00 pm | by ACS | News | Comments

Frying is one of the world’s most popular ways to prepare food. But before dunking your favorite food in a vat of just any old oil, consider using olive. Scientists are reporting that olive oil withstands the heat of the fryer or pan better than several seed oils to yield more healthful food.

Software Finds Tiny Leaks in Natural Gas Pipelines

October 22, 2014 2:00 pm | by ACS | News | Comments

Major leaks from oil and gas pipelines have led to home evacuations, explosions, millions of dollars in lawsuit payouts and valuable natural resources escaping into the air, ground and water. Now, scientists say they have developed a new software-based method that finds leaks even when they’re small, which could help prevent serious incidents— and save money for customers and industry.

Electrodialysis Removes Salt from Fracked Wells

October 21, 2014 2:00 pm | by MIT, David Chandler | News | Comments

One byproduct of fracking is millions of gallons of water that’s much saltier than seawater, after leaching salts from rocks deep below the surface. Now, researchers say they have found an economical solution for removing the salt from this water.

Organic Definition Hazy for Nonfood Items

October 21, 2014 2:00 pm | by Associated Press, Mary Jalonick | News | Comments

There's a strict set of standards for organic foods. But the rules are looser for household cleaners, textiles, cosmetics and the organic dry cleaners down the street. Absent a USDA seal or certification, there are few ways to tell if those organic claims are bogus.

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Herb Molecule Holds Potential for Drug Development

October 21, 2014 9:01 am | by Nanyang Technological Univ. | News | Comments

Scientists have discovered a new molecule that can join together chains of amino acids. Only three other known molecules have been discovered to perform this function, which is an important process in the development of new drugs. A key difference is that the new molecule can do the same process 10,000 times faster than the other three and “cleanly,” without leaving any residue behind.

Tracers Spot Fracking Fluids in Nature

October 21, 2014 8:55 am | by NSF | News | Comments

Scientists have developed new geochemical tracers that can identify hydraulic fracturing flow back fluids that have been spilled or released into the environment. The tracers have been field-tested at a spill site in West Virginia and downstream from an oil and gas brine wastewater treatment plant in Pennsylvania.

Research Yields Possible Precursor to Life

October 21, 2014 8:48 am | by Univ. of Southern Denmark | News | Comments

Researchers working toward the technology of the future are interested in the origin of life. If we can create artificial living systems, we may not only understand the origin of life, we could also revolutionize technology.

Proteins Linked to Drug Side Effects

October 21, 2014 8:29 am | by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory | News | Comments

Researchers have discovered a high-tech method of using supercomputers to identify proteins that cause medications to have certain adverse drug reactions, or side effects. They are using high-performance computers to process proteins and drug compounds in an algorithm that produces reliable data outside of a laboratory setting for drug discovery.

Tarantula Toxin Exposes Activity in Live Cells

October 21, 2014 8:06 am | by UC Davis | Videos | Comments

Researchers have created a cellular probe that combines a tarantula toxin with a fluorescent compound to help scientists observe electrical activity in neurons and other cells. The probe binds to a voltage-activated potassium ion channel subtype, lighting up when the channel is turned off and dimming when it is activated.

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Study Charts Fate of Chemicals Affecting Human Health, Environment

October 20, 2014 2:49 pm | by Arizona State Univ.'s Biodesign Institute | News | Comments

In a new study a researcher at Arizona State Univ.'s Biodesign Institute examines the trajectory of chemicals appearing as emergent threats to human or environmental health. The study reveals that around 14 years typically elapse from the onset of initial safety concerns about a given chemical to the height of concern and appropriate action. This extended timeline implies protracted exposure to CECs for a large number of people.

Starfish-like Shells Advance 3-D Printing of Pharmaceuticals

October 20, 2014 2:34 pm | by Univ. of Michigan | News | Comments

In a design that mimics a hard-to-duplicate texture of starfish shells, Univ. of Michigan engineers have made rounded crystals that have no facets. The process used to manufacture them—organic vapor jet printing—might lend itself to 3D-printing medications that absorb better into the body and make personalized dosing possible.

New Hydrogen Mixture Sees Wild Molecular Interactions

October 20, 2014 2:27 pm | by Carnegie Institution | News | Comments

Scientists have combined hydrogen with its heavier sibling deuterium—which has an added neutron in its nucleus—and created a novel, disordered, "Phase IV"-material where the molecules interact differently than have been observed before.

Green Buildings Contaminate Drinking Water

October 20, 2014 2:12 pm | by Purdue Univ. | News | Comments

Several types of plastic pipes in eco-friendly green buildings in the United States have been found to leach chemicals into drinking water that can cause odors and sometimes exist at levels that may exceed health standards.

Chemists Tackle Battery Fires, Explosions

October 17, 2014 2:00 pm | by Univ. of Kentucky | News | Comments

New research will help batteries resist overcharging, improving the safety of electronics from cellphones to airplanes. This work focused on the design, synthesis and testing of organic compounds that can be incorporated into the electrolytes of lithium-ion batteries to improve their safety profiles.

Geochemist Gets View into Center of the Earth

October 17, 2014 7:00 am | by UC Santa Barbara | News | Comments

A geochemist studying Samoan volcanoes has found evidence of the planet’s early formation still trapped inside the Earth. Known as hotspots, volcanic island chains such as Samoa can hold ancient primordial signatures from the early solar system that have somehow survived billions of years.

Flies Can Help Sniff Out Drugs, Bombs

October 17, 2014 7:00 am | by Univ. of Sussex | News | Comments

Fruit flies can identify odors from illicit drugs and explosive substances almost as accurately as wine odor, which the insects are naturally attracted to because it smells like their favorite food, fermenting fruit.

Sleep Hormone May Be Linked to Earth's Biggest Migration

October 17, 2014 7:00 am | by Inside Science News Service, Peter Gwynne | News | Comments

Each day, plankton rise from deep underwater to the ocean's surface during the night and then return to the depths in daytime. Zoologists describe this movement as Earth’s biggest migration. The stimulus for this mass migration has long puzzled scientists but it may be the sleep hormone melatonin.

Paper is Sensitive Chemical, Biological Detector

October 17, 2014 7:00 am | by AVS: Science & Technology of Materials, Interfaces, and Processing | News | Comments

Using a common laboratory filter paper decorated with gold nanoparticles, researchers have created a unique platform, known as “plasmonic paper,” for detecting and characterizing even trace amounts of chemicals and biologically important molecules— from explosives, chemical warfare agents and environmental pollutants to disease markers.

Catalyst May Improve Biofuels

October 16, 2014 2:00 pm | by Washington State Univ. | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a new catalyst, by mixing inexpensive iron with a tiny amount of rare palladium, which could lead to making biofuels cheaply and more efficiently.

Materials Make ‘Warmer’ LEDs

October 16, 2014 7:00 am | by ACS | News | Comments

Researchers have designed a family of materials to make LEDs that don’t include rare earths but instead are made out of copper iodide, which is an abundant compound. They tuned them to glow a warm white shade or various other colors using a low-cost solution process.

Cigarette Ash Finds Use as Water Cleaner

October 15, 2014 2:00 pm | by ACS | News | Comments

Arsenic, a well-known poison, can be taken out of drinking water using sophisticated treatment methods. Now, scientists have come up with a new low-cost, simple way to remove arsenic using leftovers from another known health threat— cigarettes.

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