Advertisement
Biology
Subscribe to Biology

The Lead

Toddlers Emulate Peers, Apes Don't

October 31, 2014 7:00 am | by Association for Psychological Science | News | Comments

From the playground to the board room, people often conform to the behavior of those around them as a way of fitting in. New research shows that this behavioral conformity appears early in human children, but isn’t evidenced by apes like chimpanzees and orangutans.

Research Sheds Light on Source of Stem Cells

October 31, 2014 7:00 am | by Michigan State Univ. | News | Comments

A study has provided insights into where stem cells come from and could advance research in...

Research Finds Key to Cheaper Biofuels, Improved Crops

October 31, 2014 7:00 am | by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

By manipulating a plant’s metabolic pathways, two scientists have figured out a way to...

Bats Like to Hang Out with Friends

October 31, 2014 7:00 am | by Centre for Ecology & Hydrology | News | Comments

New research has shown that despite moving house frequently, bats choose to roost with the same...

View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

Research Finds Key to Cheaper Biofuels, Improved Crops

October 31, 2014 7:00 am | by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

By manipulating a plant’s metabolic pathways, two scientists have figured out a way to genetically rewire plants to allow for an exceptionally high level of control over the spatial pattern of gene expression, while at the same time boosting expression to very high levels. Now, they have launched a startup company to apply this technology for developing low-cost biofuels that could be cost-competitive with gasoline and corn ethanol.

Bats Like to Hang Out with Friends

October 31, 2014 7:00 am | by Centre for Ecology & Hydrology | News | Comments

New research has shown that despite moving house frequently, bats choose to roost with the same social groups of “friends.” The study found that different social groups roost in separate, though adjacent, parts of woodland. The findings have important implications for conservation as bats may not be able to move to another area if a section of woodland is felled.

Research Sheds Light on Source of Stem Cells

October 31, 2014 7:00 am | by Michigan State Univ. | News | Comments

A study has provided insights into where stem cells come from and could advance research in regenerative medicine. The work also has significant implications for fertility research.

Advertisement

Sound Waves May Help Replace Tissue

October 30, 2014 2:00 pm | by Acoustical Society of America | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a way to use sound to create cellular scaffolding for tissue engineering, a unique approach that could help overcome one of regenerative medicine’s significant obstacles.

Proven: Scratching Makes You Itch

October 30, 2014 2:00 pm | by Washington Univ. School of Medicine in St. Louis | News | Comments

Turns out your mom was right: scratching an itch only makes it worse. New research indicates that scratching causes the brain to release serotonin, which intensifies the itch sensation. The find provides new clues that may help break that cycle, particularly in people who experience chronic itching.

Tech May Improve Communication with Your Dog

October 30, 2014 2:00 pm | by North Carolina State Univ. | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a suite of technologies that can be used to enhance communication between dogs and humans. It has applications in everything from search and rescue to service dogs to training our pets. The platform opens the door to new avenues for interpreting dogs’ behavioral signals and sending them clear and unambiguous cues in return.

Early BPA Exposure Linked to Later Food Intolerance

October 30, 2014 2:00 pm | by Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology | News | Comments

Scientists have shown that there is a link between perinatal exposure to BPA at low doses and the risk of developing food intolerance in later life. This research, involving rats, suggests that early life exposure at a dose significantly below the current human safety limit set by the FDA affects developing immune systems, predisposing offspring to food intolerance in adulthood.

Do You Know the Truth About Your Shrimp?

October 30, 2014 2:00 pm | by Associated Press, Cain Burdeau | News | Comments

An advocacy group says it found about 30 percent of 143 shrimp products bought from 111 vendors were not what the label said. Cheap imported farm-raised shrimp is being sold as prized wild-caught Gulf shrimp, common shrimp sold as premium shrimp and shrimp of all kinds sold with no indication whatsoever about their origin.

Advertisement

Molecule Protects Plants from the Harsh Sun

October 30, 2014 7:00 am | by ACS | News | Comments

Plants rely on sunlight to make their food, but they also need protection from its harmful rays, just like humans do. Now, scientists have discovered a group of molecules in plants that shields them from sun damage.

Lab-made Enzyme May Explain Origins of Life

October 29, 2014 2:00 pm | by The Scripps Research Institute | News | Comments

Mimicking natural evolution in a test tube, scientists have devised an enzyme with a unique property that might have been crucial to the origin of life on Earth. Aside from illuminating one possible path for life's beginnings, the achievement is likely to yield a powerful tool for evolving new and useful molecules.

Scientists Make Human Stomach Tissue with Stem Cells

October 29, 2014 2:00 pm | by Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center | News | Comments

Scientists used pluripotent stem cells to generate functional, three-dimensional human stomach tissue in a laboratory– creating an unprecedented tool for researching the development and diseases of an organ central to several public health crises, ranging from cancer to diabetes.

Contamination Likely Caused Puzzling Study Results

October 29, 2014 2:00 pm | by Univ. of Michigan | News | Comments

Laboratory contaminants likely explain the results of a recent study claiming that complete genes can pass from foods we eat into our blood, according to a molecular biologist who reexamined data from the controversial research paper. The findings highlight an underappreciated problem— contamination of laboratory samples— with one of the most popular and powerful new tools of the discipline: high-throughput sequencing.

Shiitake Extract May Treat HPV

October 29, 2014 7:00 am | by The Univ. of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Medical School | News | Comments

An extract from shiitake mushrooms appears to be effective for the eradication of human papillomavirus (HPV), according to a pilot clinical trial. Ten HPV-positive women were treated orally with the extract, AHCC, once daily for up to six months. Five achieved a negative HPV test result– three with confirmed eradication after stopping AHCC.

Advertisement

MRI Sees Odd Brain Structures in Chronic Fatigue Patients

October 29, 2014 7:00 am | by Radiological Society of North America | News | Comments

Researchers using a combination of different imaging techniques have found structural abnormalities in the brains of people with chronic fatigue syndrome, according to a new study. The results suggest a potential role for imaging in diagnosing and treating the condition.

Bacteria May Save Bees

October 29, 2014 7:00 am | by Brigham Young Univ. | Videos | Comments

For decades, honeybees have been battling a deadly disease that kills off their larvae and leads to hive collapse. It’s called American Foulbrood and its effects are so devastating and infectious, it often requires infected hives to be burned to the ground. Now, an undergraduate has produced a natural way to eliminate the scourge, and it’s working: using tiny killer bugs known as phages to protect baby bees from infection.

High Milk Diet Linked to Health Problems, Death

October 29, 2014 7:00 am | by British Medical Journal | News | Comments

A high milk intake in women and men is not accompanied by a lower risk of fracture and instead may be associated with a higher rate of death, suggests observational research. This may be explained by the high levels of lactose and galactose in milk, which have been shown to increase oxidative stress and chronic inflammation in animal studies.

Native Tortoises Make a Comeback on Galapagos Island

October 29, 2014 7:00 am | by SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry | News | Comments

A population of endangered giant tortoises, which once dwindled to just over a dozen, has recovered on the Galapagos island of Española. Some 40 years after the first captive-bred tortoises were reintroduced to the island by the Galapagos National Park Service, the endemic Española giant tortoises are reproducing and restoring some of the ecological damage caused by feral goats that were brought to the island in the late 19th century.

Infants React to Social Cues from Sclera

October 28, 2014 2:00 pm | by Univ. of Virginia | News | Comments

Humans are the only primates with large, highly visible sclera– the white part of the eye. The eye plays a significant role in the expressiveness of a face, and how much sclera is shown can indicate the emotions or behavioral attitudes of a person. A new study has found that the ability to respond to eye cues apparently develops during infancy– at around seven months.

Test Needs One Drop of Blood to Check Vitamin B12

October 28, 2014 7:00 am | by Univ. of British Columbia | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a novel method to test for vitamin B12 deficiency that is sensitive enough to work on anyone, including newborn babies and large swaths of the general population.

Cell Membranes Spontaneously Assemble

October 28, 2014 7:00 am | by UC San Diego | News | Comments

All living cells use membranes to define physical boundaries and control the movement of biomolecules. Now, researchers have found a self-driven reaction can assemble phospholipid membranes, like those that enclose cells.

Immune System Gene Key to Slowing Biological Clock

October 28, 2014 7:00 am | by American Friends of Tel Aviv Univ. | News | Comments

Difficulty in conceiving a child is a major challenge for one in seven heterosexual couples in America, especially for those over the age of 35. Now, a study has found that neutralizing an immune system gene could improve the success of fertility treatments in women.

Researchers Learn How Cells Sense, Respond to Chemicals

October 28, 2014 7:00 am | by Johns Hopkins Medicine | Videos | Comments

Amoebas aren’t the only cells that crawl: movement is crucial to development, wound healing and immune response in animals, not to mention cancer metastasis. In two new studies, researchers have answered long-standing questions about how complex cells sense the chemical trails that show them where to go— and the role of cells’ internal “skeleton” in responding to those cues.

Staph Hides from the Immune System

October 27, 2014 2:00 pm | by The Univ. of Chicago | News | Comments

A potentially lethal bacterium protects itself by causing immune tunnel vision, according to a study. By tricking the immune system into focusing on one bug-associated factor, the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus dodges the production of antibodies that would otherwise protect against infection.

Imaging Helps Catalog Fundamental Processes of Life

October 27, 2014 2:00 pm | by Univ. of Cambridge | News | Comments

Scientists combined high-resolution 3-D confocal microscopy and computer-automated analysis of the images to survey the fission yeast genome with respect to three key cellular processes simultaneously: cell shape, microtubule organization and cell cycle progression.

Scientists Find New Uses for Diamonds

October 27, 2014 2:00 pm | by Cardiff Univ. | News | Comments

Nanodiamonds are providing scientists with new possibilities for accurate measurements of processes inside living cells with potential to improve drug delivery and cancer therapeutics.

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading