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Stress During Pregnancy Leads to Bullied Children

Thu, 11/15/2012 - 8:15am
Univ. of Warwick

Image: Univ. of WarwickChildren whose mothers were overly stressed during pregnancy are more likely to become victims of bullying at school.

New research from the Univ. of Warwick shows stress and mental health problems in pregnant women may affect the developing baby and directly increases the risk of the child being victimized in later life.

The study has been published in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and is based on 8,829 children from the Avon Longtitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC).

Prof. Dieter Wolke, professor of developmental psychology at Univ. of Warwick and Warwick Medical School headed up the study.

He says, “This is the first study to investigate stress in pregnancy and a child’s vulnerability to being bullied. When we are exposed to stress, large quantities of neurohormones are released into the blood stream and in a pregnant woman this can change the developing fetus’ own stress response system. Changes in the stress response system can affect behavior and how children react emotionally to stress such as being picked on by a bully. Children who more easily show a stress reaction such as crying, running away, anxiety are then selected by bullies.”

The research team identified the main prenatal stress factors as severe family problems, such as financial difficulty, or alcohol/drug abuse and maternal mental health.

Wolke adds, “The whole thing becomes a vicious cycle, a child with an altered stress response system is more likely to be bullied, which affects their stress response even further and increases the likelihood of them developing mental health problems in later life.”

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