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Research Yields Possible Precursor to Life

October 21, 2014 | by Univ. of Southern Denmark | Comments

Researchers working toward the technology of the future are interested in the origin of life. If we can create artificial living systems, we may not only understand the origin of life, we could also revolutionize technology.

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Organic Definition Hazy for Nonfood Items

October 21, 2014 2:00 pm | by Associated Press, Mary Jalonick | Comments

There's a strict set of standards for organic foods. But the rules are looser for household cleaners, textiles, cosmetics and the organic dry cleaners down the street. Absent a USDA seal or certification, there are few ways to tell if those organic claims are bogus.

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Stone Confirms History Theory

October 21, 2014 2:00 pm | by Associated Press | Comments

Today, Israeli archaeologists said they discovered a large stone with Latin engravings that lends credence to the theory that the reason Jews revolted against Roman rule nearly 2,000 ago was because of their harsh treatment.

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CVS to Punish Patronage of Tobacco-selling Pharmacies

October 21, 2014 2:00 pm | by Associated Press, Tom Murphy | Comments

CVS is developing a new tobacco-free pharmacy network for clients of its Caremark pharmacy benefits management business. The network would slap an extra co-payment on patients who fill their prescriptions at stores that still sell tobacco.

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Imaging Solves 40-Year-Old Mystery

October 21, 2014 2:00 pm | by National Institutes of Health | Comments

Mitochondrial oscillations have quietly bewildered scientists for more than 40 years. Now, a team of scientists has imaged mitochondria for the first time oscillating in a live animal, in this case, the salivary glands of laboratory rats. Their report shows the oscillations occur spontaneously and often in the rodent cells, which leads the researchers to believe the oscillations almost surely also occur in human cells.

Experimental Drug May Treat Norovirus

October 21, 2014 2:00 pm | by Univ. of Cambridge | Comments

An experimental drug currently being trialed for influenza and Ebola viruses could have a new target: norovirus, often known as the winter vomiting virus. A team of researchers has shown that the drug, favipiravir, is effective at reducing– and in some cases eliminating– norovirus infection in mice.

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Electrodialysis Removes Salt from Fracked Wells

October 21, 2014 2:00 pm | by MIT, David Chandler | Comments

One byproduct of fracking is millions of gallons of water that’s much saltier than seawater, after leaching salts from rocks deep below the surface. Now, researchers say they have found an economical solution for removing the salt from this water.

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Early Universe's Temp Could Have Supported Life

October 21, 2014 2:00 pm | by Inside Science News Service, Ker Than | Comments

Life in the universe could be much older than previously thought, forming as early as 15 million years after the Big Bang, according to a provocative new idea proposed by an astrophysicist. In this scenario for the early universe, rocky planets born from the dregs of massive, primordial stars would have been warmed by the heat of a radiation that permeated all of space, which was much hotter back then than it is now.

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Herb Molecule Holds Potential for Drug Development

October 21, 2014 9:01 am | by Nanyang Technological Univ. | Comments

Scientists have discovered a new molecule that can join together chains of amino acids. Only three other known molecules have been discovered to perform this function, which is an important process in the development of new drugs. A key difference is that the new molecule can do the same process 10,000 times faster than the other three and “cleanly,” without leaving any residue behind.

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Tracers Spot Fracking Fluids in Nature

October 21, 2014 8:55 am | by NSF | Comments

Scientists have developed new geochemical tracers that can identify hydraulic fracturing flow back fluids that have been spilled or released into the environment. The tracers have been field-tested at a spill site in West Virginia and downstream from an oil and gas brine wastewater treatment plant in Pennsylvania.

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Science Doesn’t Support ‘Brain Game’ Claims

October 21, 2014 8:42 am | by Stanford Univ. | Comments

Scientists have issued a statement saying they are skeptical about the effectiveness of so-called "brain game" products, which are marketed as helping older adults boost their mental powers. Signing the document were 69 scholars, including cognitive psychologists and neuroscientists from around the world.

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Mental Rest, Reflection Aid Learning

October 21, 2014 8:35 am | by The Univ. of Texas at Austin | Comments

A new study that may have implications for approaches to education finds that brain mechanisms, engaged when people allow their minds to rest and reflect on things they've learned before, may boost later learning.

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Proteins Linked to Drug Side Effects

October 21, 2014 8:29 am | by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory | Comments

Researchers have discovered a high-tech method of using supercomputers to identify proteins that cause medications to have certain adverse drug reactions, or side effects. They are using high-performance computers to process proteins and drug compounds in an algorithm that produces reliable data outside of a laboratory setting for drug discovery.

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Research Points to Off Switch for Drug Resistance in Cancer

October 21, 2014 8:23 am | by Salk Institute for Biological Studies | Comments

Scientists have uncovered details about how cancer is able to become drug resistant over time, a phenomenon that occurs because cancer cells within the same tumor aren't identical— the cells have slight genetic variation, or diversity. Variations in breast cancer cells' RNA, the molecule that decodes genes and produces proteins, helps the cancer evolve more quickly than previously thought.

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CD8 T Cells Will Fight Many Viruses

October 21, 2014 8:14 am | by Brown Univ. | Comments

Scientists think of CD8 T cells as long-lived cells that become tuned to fight just one pathogen, but a new study finds that once CD8 T cells fight one pathogen, they also join the body's "innate" immune system, ready to answer the calls of the cytokine signals that are set off by a wide variety of infections.

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Researchers ID Key Transition to Problematic Drinking

October 21, 2014 8:10 am | by UC San Francisco | Comments

A team of researchers has found that a tiny segment of genetic material known as a microRNA plays a central role in the transition from moderate drinking to binge drinking and other alcohol use disorders.

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