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Tracers Spot Fracking Fluids in Nature

October 21, 2014 8:55 am | by NSF | News | Comments

Scientists have developed new geochemical tracers that can identify hydraulic fracturing flow back fluids that have been spilled or released into the environment. The tracers have been field-tested at a spill site in West Virginia and downstream from an oil and gas brine wastewater treatment plant in Pennsylvania.

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Research Yields Possible Precursor to Life

October 21, 2014 8:48 am | by Univ. of Southern Denmark | News | Comments

Researchers working toward the technology of the future are interested in the origin of life. If we can create artificial living systems, we may not only understand the origin of life, we could also revolutionize technology.

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Science Doesn’t Support ‘Brain Game’ Claims

October 21, 2014 8:42 am | by Stanford Univ. | News | Comments

Scientists have issued a statement saying they are skeptical about the effectiveness of so-called "brain game" products, which are marketed as helping older adults boost their mental powers. Signing the document were 69 scholars, including cognitive psychologists and neuroscientists from around the world.

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Mental Rest, Reflection Aid Learning

October 21, 2014 8:35 am | by The Univ. of Texas at Austin | News | Comments

A new study that may have implications for approaches to education finds that brain mechanisms, engaged when people allow their minds to rest and reflect on things they've learned before, may boost later learning.

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Proteins Linked to Drug Side Effects

October 21, 2014 8:29 am | by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory | News | Comments

Researchers have discovered a high-tech method of using supercomputers to identify proteins that cause medications to have certain adverse drug reactions, or side effects. They are using high-performance computers to process proteins and drug compounds in an algorithm that produces reliable data outside of a laboratory setting for drug discovery.

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Research Points to Off Switch for Drug Resistance in Cancer

October 21, 2014 8:23 am | by Salk Institute for Biological Studies | News | Comments

Scientists have uncovered details about how cancer is able to become drug resistant over time, a phenomenon that occurs because cancer cells within the same tumor aren't identical— the cells have slight genetic variation, or diversity. Variations in breast cancer cells' RNA, the molecule that decodes genes and produces proteins, helps the cancer evolve more quickly than previously thought.

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CD8 T Cells Will Fight Many Viruses

October 21, 2014 8:14 am | by Brown Univ. | News | Comments

Scientists think of CD8 T cells as long-lived cells that become tuned to fight just one pathogen, but a new study finds that once CD8 T cells fight one pathogen, they also join the body's "innate" immune system, ready to answer the calls of the cytokine signals that are set off by a wide variety of infections.

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Researchers ID Key Transition to Problematic Drinking

October 21, 2014 8:10 am | by UC San Francisco | News | Comments

A team of researchers has found that a tiny segment of genetic material known as a microRNA plays a central role in the transition from moderate drinking to binge drinking and other alcohol use disorders.

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Tarantula Toxin Exposes Activity in Live Cells

October 21, 2014 8:06 am | by UC Davis | Videos | Comments

Researchers have created a cellular probe that combines a tarantula toxin with a fluorescent compound to help scientists observe electrical activity in neurons and other cells. The probe binds to a voltage-activated potassium ion channel subtype, lighting up when the channel is turned off and dimming when it is activated.

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Subliminal Aging Messages Improve Physical Functioning in Elderly

October 20, 2014 2:53 pm | by Yale | News | Comments

Older individuals who are subliminally exposed to positive stereotypes about aging showed improved physical functioning that can last for several weeks. Researchers used a novel intervention method to examine for the first time whether exposure to positive age stereotypes could weaken negative age stereotypes and their effects over time, and lead to healthier outcomes.

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Study Charts Fate of Chemicals Affecting Human Health, Environment

October 20, 2014 2:49 pm | by Arizona State Univ.'s Biodesign Institute | News | Comments

In a new study a researcher at Arizona State Univ.'s Biodesign Institute examines the trajectory of chemicals appearing as emergent threats to human or environmental health. The study reveals that around 14 years typically elapse from the onset of initial safety concerns about a given chemical to the height of concern and appropriate action. This extended timeline implies protracted exposure to CECs for a large number of people.

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Secrets of Dinosaur Ecology Found in Fragile Amber

October 20, 2014 2:41 pm | by The Geological Society of America | News | Comments

Ryan McKellar’s research sounds like it was plucked from Jurassic Park: he studies pieces of amber found buried with dinosaur skeletons. But rather than re-creating dinosaurs, McKellar uses the tiny pieces of fossilized tree resin to study the world in which the now-extinct behemoths lived.

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Brain Activity Provides Evidence for Internal Calorie Counter

October 20, 2014 2:38 pm | by Association for Psychological Science | News | Comments

As you glance over a menu or peruse the shelves in a supermarket, you may be thinking about how each food will taste and whether it’s nutritious, or you may be trying to decide what you’re in the mood for. A new neuroimaging study suggests that while you’re thinking all these things, an internal calorie counter of sorts is also evaluating each food based on its caloric density.

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Starfish-like Shells Advance 3-D Printing of Pharmaceuticals

October 20, 2014 2:34 pm | by Univ. of Michigan | News | Comments

In a design that mimics a hard-to-duplicate texture of starfish shells, Univ. of Michigan engineers have made rounded crystals that have no facets. The process used to manufacture them—organic vapor jet printing—might lend itself to 3D-printing medications that absorb better into the body and make personalized dosing possible.

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New Hydrogen Mixture Sees Wild Molecular Interactions

October 20, 2014 2:27 pm | by Carnegie Institution | News | Comments

Scientists have combined hydrogen with its heavier sibling deuterium—which has an added neutron in its nucleus—and created a novel, disordered, "Phase IV"-material where the molecules interact differently than have been observed before.

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